November 2017

   

India:
Saving Mothers In India's Heartland


India:
Tamil Nadu Cares For Its Mothers,Shows India How To Tackle MMR


Philippines:
As Always, Free Condoms Surest Way To Address AIDS


India:
Married at 14, Mothers At 15: Child Brides Of Tribal Odisha


India:
City Lights And City Nightmares: Lives Running On Empty


France:
C'est la Vie: Immigrant Lebanese Woman in France


Canada:
Mental Health: Lost In Translation


India:
Do You Exist? Show Your Address to Prove It


India:
Marketing Contraception: Do Women's Bodies Matter?


India:
Living Behind Bars - Women Tell Their Stories


India:
'I Want a Different Life, But Give Me Options.' Sex Workers And Rehab


India:
Census And The Child Sex Ratio: Where Have All The Young Girls Gone?


Jordan:
Child Brides And The Marriage Trap In Jordan


India:
Tackling Child Mortality? Let's Do It


India:
Teenage Pregnancy: Bengal's Dilemma


India:
The Trial Of A Vaccine Trial




 

 

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National Youth Day

National Youth Day (Yuva Diwas or Swami Vivekananda Birthday) is celebrated in India every year on 12th of January.

Women's Feature Service brings you some features from achieve on the issue.

The birthday of the Swami Vivekananda was decided to be celebrated as the National Youth Day to complete the aim of making better future of the country by motivating the youths through the way of life and ideas of the Swami Vivekananda.



India:
Taught Not To Think: An Elegy For Our Education System
 By Vanya Vaidehi Bhargav

AT A TIME OF YEAR WHEN students passing out of schools are dreaming of entering college, a young student provides a first-person critique of India's education system that privileges facts over thought and imagination; that considers it more important that students know the answers than think critically for themselves; that deems examinations more important than knowledge itself. She concludes that the saddest and most dangerous aspect of it all is that the education system, whether at school or at the undergraduate level, does not encourage students to think independently, critically, creatively or analytically.

* ‘No one seemed to care very much about my opinion and judgment, and so I figured it didn't matter what I thought. I passed out of Stephen's with a first division, and came second in class in my final year.’

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India:
Indian Youth, Just A Click Away
By Bobby Jha

THE YOUTH OF INDIA ARE THE flavour of the times. In 2011, it was their networking and activism that helped provide heft to Anna Hazare's India Against Corruption campaign. In 2012, it was their outrage that caused the government to reform the law against sexual assault. In 2013, it was they who were credited with having brought a novice of a political entity, the Aam Aadmi Party, to power in Delhi. What are the aspects that make up this category of Indians? How literate are they? What are their prospects? At what age do they marry? What is their employment profile? What are the differences between young women and young men? We know that India at the moment is among the youngest countries in the world. How does this play out in terms of the employment profile of its youth? Do you want to know more? Well, YouthInfoIndia.org brings on to a single platform all the available data on Indian youth.

* “The portal is a lively place where you can spend your time knowing more about India's young people.”

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India:
Northeast Youngsters Are Looking For Equal Opportunities
By Azera Parveen Rahman

EVERY YEAR, HUNDREDS OF YOUNG WOMEN and men from the seven states of the Northeast pack their bags and move to cities like Delhi, Mumbai, Pune and Bangalore in search of better education and employment opportunities. It’s not an easy decision for them but one that they are forced to take in order to escape the threats of conflict and overcome the frustration of joblessness that plague their everyday lives. Whether it's Jenpu, a Naga, who has lost his brother to drug overdose and dropped out of school, or Joutishman, an Assamese, who wants better infrastructure in his state so that industries are encouraged to set up shop, or Sarah Phangchopi of the Karbi Anglong area, which often sees violent clashes between different ethnic groups, they all fervently hope their region can move on to bigger and better things like the rest of the country.

* ‘No one wants to leave home for a petty job, but where is the choice? Those who cannot succeed get frustrated and fall into the traps of alcohol and drugs. We want equal opportunities like everyone else.’

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India:
Youth Clubs Fight Hunger
By Ajitha Menon

KSHAMA MONDAL, 19, OF HOSIBAD VILLAGE, under Jhunjkagram panchayat in Chhatna block of Bankura district, West Bengal, enjoys learning new facts related to the food and nutrition and then putting them into practice. From being an active participant in the nutrition camps organised regularly in her village, Kshama has moved on to encouraging others. As a member of the Hosibad Naba Tarun Taruni Dal, a youth group in her village, she is involved in activities that create awareness on issues related to health, education and development. Like Kshama, youngsters in 32 villages of Ghoshergram and Jhunjkagram panchayats have formed groups – comprising 10-15 members – that have taken on the responsibility of monitoring Integrated Child Development Services and mid day meals, conducting nutrition workshops and checking on the implementation of the Right to Education Act as well as the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act. Food security, education security and income security – that's their mantra and ultimate aim.

* “Our group conducts workshops where we explain the nutritional value of different leaves, fruits, grains that are available in our area. For us young girls this is learning for when we become mothers”.

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India:
Provocative. Daring.Awesome.Young Kerala Triggers A Debate For Change
By Shwetha E. George

Earlier this month, India woke up to screaming headlines and risqu é photographs splashed across various leading dailies: ‘Love in the Time of Bigotry’; “ ‘Kiss of Love' Campaign Meets Wall of Cops”; “Mass ‘kissing' Protests in Kerala cities against Moral Policing”… The reports described how young Kerala had taken to the streets to kiss and hug one another in protest of the vandalism unleashed by right wing activists in a cafe in Kozhikode perceived as a popular dating spot. Despite threats by the ultraconservatives and harassment by the police, nearly 100 youngsters challenged the “cultural fascism” by a rather uncharacteristic public display of affection. What’s more, their Kiss of Love campaign has now gone viral, with cities like Hyderabad, Delhi, Kolkata and Mumbai holding their very own versions. So, is ‘conservative’ Kerala undergoing some kind of transformation today? Are people ready to shake off the existing “orthodox” patriarchy just yet? We speak to a few spirited college-goers and experienced professors to get some answers.

* “The protest was a direct response to the vandalising of a caf? by a few youth wing party workers who alleged that couples were often seen kissing there. The ideal thing to do would have been to arrest those vandalisers. But police inaction and public apathy triggered this rebellion.”

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